McDonald’s just made the Big Mac of acquisitions with its purchase of Dynamic Yield, a Tel Aviv-based startup that provides retailers with “decision logic” technology. It’s the biggest buy the brand has made since 1999 and digs into the customization boom heating up the restaurant business. But with fast food restaurants fighting over the spotlight, will the tech tactic be enough to cook up sustainable consumer attention for McDonald’s?

When it comes to the three C’s of delivery, many restaurants have been focused on comfort and convenience via swipe-up-to-order options on Instagram, quick customer service on Twitter, compelling content across platforms, and more often social-media-centric strategies according to Gartner L2’s Digital IQ Index: Restaurants. But McDonald’s latest push taps into the third, less common C: customization.

The restaurant’s new technology takes into account elements surrounding the consumer’s decision to drive-thru for a meal, such as weather, time of day, local traffic, nearby events, and historical sales data, both at that franchise and across the globe. For example, menu banners that were once static at the restaurant’s drive-thru will now show customers what other items have been popular recently, then prompting them with potential upsells, like a coffee for a tired parent who just ordered three Happy Meals or a McFlurry after midnight.

Fresh off a hot mobile campaign, McDonald’s is no stranger to trying to get up close and personal with consumers. In the past, the burger builder has also enabled customers to build meals and cross-sell other products via its app. Though heaping on technology to digital assets is not a new move for restaurants, adding a dash of customization to the drive-thru experience could take this focus further and present consumers with a seamless experience across all meal situations and a more connected, modern McDonald’s overall.

Daily Insights in Your Inbox

Edit your preferences or unsubscribe